How to help the government get more info on Canada’s military activities

With military spending soaring and tensions running high, the Harper government has been pushing ahead with plans to open up its national security archives and make them available to Canadians.

In a letter to defence minister Harjit Sajjan, obtained by CBC News, the Office of the Defence Information Commissioner said it will release all of the files it has in its archives as of the end of 2019.

It’s a move that has the blessing of some of the highest-ranking government officials, but it’s also a bit controversial.

The office of defence secretary, Gen. Sean MacGregor, has said the files should remain classified, citing the need to protect Canadians from any future harm.

The government has defended the move saying it’s to provide Canadians with the full picture of what’s going on on the ground.

The office of the defence secretary said in a statement that the government has made every effort to ensure the files are classified, but they can still be released.

We’ve had a number of people in our government have asked us to say no.

So it is a matter of what we’re comfortable with, and if that is not possible we will make an exception for the files.

‘We’re not afraid to say ‘no’ to Trump’

The National Rifle Association’s most recent ad campaign has been critical of President Donald Trump, but its main message of defiance is “we’re not going to be intimidated by him.”

In the new spot, an NRA spokesperson called the Trump administration’s new push to crack down on guns a “complete failure” and said the NRA will continue to push for common sense gun safety laws.

In the ad, which is set to air in Pennsylvania, a woman wearing a white polo shirt and a dark skirt walks into a local Walmart and asks for a gun.

She tells the clerk, “I’ve been here for three days and I’m still not buying one.”

The clerk responds, “Well, I’d like to see it.”

“No problem, ma’am.

It’s just too late.

I already have one.””

It’s too late for you, too.

There’s a gun right here.”

The woman goes to a different store, this time one with a sign that reads, “We’re Not Going to Be Doxxed.”

The message to gun owners is clear: We’re not scared to say “no” to Trump.

“You’re going to make it to the end of the line,” the woman says.

“I promise.

I promise.”

This ad marks the second time the NRA has targeted Trump with an ad that challenges him on gun control, after a previous campaign in January.

The NRA released a new ad that it says “challenges the President’s baseless assertions of gun violence.”

Trump has also been criticized for his push to enact stricter gun control measures, including his recent executive order barring all federal agencies from engaging in any form of gun control except for training, as well as his plan to create a national registry of all gun owners.

The NRA says that the Trump Administration’s actions have “resulted in more gun violence” and have resulted in an increase in gun deaths and injuries.

The organization also released a statement earlier this month calling the administration’s “unprecedented” attempt to limit gun access “unconstitutional.”